All posts by mfeilner

Interesting Study on Self-Supervised Learing…

Ai is now learning with images of kittens, and I really like the cats, birds and moving images examples in these slides: 

self_supervision3.pptx

The ImageNet Challenge Story … Outcomes Strong supervision:

• Features from networks trained on ImageNet can be used for other visual tasks, e.g. detection, segmentation, action recognition, fine grained visual classification

• To some extent, any visual task can be solved now by:
1. Construct a large-scale dataset labelled for that task
2. Specify a training loss and neural network architecture
3. Train the network and deploy

Brain signals translated into speech | Bioscience Today

https://www.biosciencetoday.co.uk/brain-signals-translated-into-speech/

Speech is an amazing form of communication that has evolved over thousands of years to be very efficient,” said Edward F. Chang, M.D., professor of neurological surgery at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and senior author of this study published in Nature. “Many of us take for granted how easy it is to speak, which is why losing that ability can be so devastating. It is our hope that this approach will be helpful to people whose muscles enabling audible speech are paralyzed.

Gopher needs encryption!

https://gopher.floodgap.com/gopher/gw.lite?gopher://tilde.team:70/0/~rain1/phlog/20190608-encrypting-gopher.txt


So in summary, I think encryption isn't super important. Gopher is great as it is and if something is good don't mangle it. But it would be nice to add encryption somehow! We should do it in a way that the community agrees on. To keep in the spirit of gopher we should figure out a simple encryption system that a normal programmer can implement in a weekend. This is totally possible to do with strong security - but this system isn't TLS.

The US of A has a huge security problem: poverty

 The United States Has a National-Security Problem—and It’s Not What You Think | The Nation … :

It’s time to rethink the American national security state with its annual trillion-dollar budget. For tens of millions of Americans, the source of deep workaday insecurity isn’t the standard roster of foreign enemies, but an ever-more entrenched system of inequality, still growing, that stacks the political deck against the least well-off Americans. They lack the bucks to hire big-time lobbyists. They can’t write lavish checks to candidates running for public office or fund PACs. They have no way of manipulating the myriad influence-generating networks that the elite uses to shape taxation and spending policies. They are up against a system in which money truly does talk—and that’s the voice they don’t have. Welcome to the United States of Inequality.